Ottawa Community Foundation https://www.ocf-fco.ca Your centre for community philanthropy Tue, 18 Sep 2018 12:43:27 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.9.8 https://www.ocf-fco.ca/wp-content/uploads/2017/04/OCF_EN-icon-66x66.png Ottawa Community Foundation https://www.ocf-fco.ca 32 32 Hales and Hurley Parliamentary Foundation Fund https://www.ocf-fco.ca/blog/hales-hurley/ Wed, 02 May 2018 17:52:48 +0000 https://www.ocf-fco.ca/?p=8611 The Parliamentary Internship Programme’s interns for 2017-2018 in the Hall of Honour in the Centre Block on Parliament Hill. The new Hales and Hurley Parliamentary Foundation will support the PIP’s long-term sustainability and benefit young Canadians for years to come. This story was shared as part of our 2017 Annual Report. Our 2017 [...]

The post Hales and Hurley Parliamentary Foundation Fund appeared first on Ottawa Community Foundation.

]]>

The Parliamentary Internship Programme’s interns for 2017-2018 in the Hall of Honour in the Centre Block on Parliament Hill. The new Hales and Hurley Parliamentary Foundation will support the PIP’s long-term sustainability and benefit young Canadians for years to come.

This story was shared as part of our 2017 Annual Report.

Our 2017 featured fund was set up by the Parliamentary Internship Programme (PIP) to support its long-term sustainability. Creating these types of funds is a role we are uniquely positioned to play given our success in managing endowments, which generate a steady stream of income for organizations or groups such as the PIP.

Close to 500 young Canadians have benefited from the PIP since its founding in 1969. Recent university graduates and young professionals intern with members of Parliament to gain valuable skills and experience in public service. From writing statements, research papers and questions for Question Period to helping to prepare bills and motions in the House of Commons, participants immerse themselves in the work of Parliament over their 10-month full-time paid placements.

The PIP is the legacy of former MP Alfred Hales, who achieved all-party support to create the program which he saw as an opportunity for Canadians to learn about the legislative process in a meaningful way. Its inaugural director, James Ross Hurley, a former professor at the University of Ottawa, as well as a constitutional advisor in the Federal government, remains a strong supporter of the program.

Over time, dedicated members of the PIP Alumni Association considered the idea of giving back. We were able to offer them a perfect vehicle to explore solutions to enhance their fundraising efforts and legacy giving options, including handling complex gifts and bequests. This led to the establishment of the Hales and Hurley Parliamentary Foundation Fund, one of hundreds we manage.

“Setting up a stand-alone foundation was turning out to be a daunting prospect, but the OCF team quickly offered the viable fund option and took us through the process step-by-step,” explains Dr. Anne Dance, the PIP’s director and herself a former intern in the program. “They specifically tailored the Hales and Hurley Parliamentary Foundation Fund to the short and long-term goals of the Parliamentary Internship Programme and the Alumni Association. They impressed us with the simplicity of giving through the many options they offer.”

Dr. Dance refers to one particular goal that would improve the program’s inclusiveness and accessibility. “The 10 interns have always earned a stipend for their ten months of work,” she explains. “I would like to increase this stipend to ensure it is less of a barrier to applicants with young families or student loans, or for those traveling to Ottawa from remote regions of the country.” The steady and growing income generated from the fund is an ideal way to achieve this goal.

Looking ahead, the program’s upcoming 50th anniversary is expected to spark additional interest among supporters to contribute.

“This will be a wonderful opportunity to grow our fund with the OCF and foster the long-term sustainability of the Programme for many years to come,” Dr Dance concludes. “Thanks to the Hales and Hurley Parliamentary Foundation Fund and the continued expertise of the OCF, our fundraising campaign has become easier—and more ambitious.”

For our part, we are particularly delighted to be part of such an important legacy, one which benefits young people from all across Canada and is played out right in our own backyard.

The PIP is a non-partisan initiative of the Canadian Political Science Association. To learn more their work, click here. If you are interested in establishing a fund with us, please visit our website at ocf-fco.ca.

 

The post Hales and Hurley Parliamentary Foundation Fund appeared first on Ottawa Community Foundation.

]]>
Creating memories, one ticket at a time https://www.ocf-fco.ca/blog/kids-up-front/ Wed, 11 Apr 2018 19:41:48 +0000 https://www.ocf-fco.ca/?p=8400 A group of local youth watched the Ottawa Senators play their last home game of the season on April 2, 2018, thanks to Kids Up Front partners. There are certain events from your childhood that you will always cherish. Remember the feeling of pure excitement when you attended your first NHL game? Or [...]

The post Creating memories, one ticket at a time appeared first on Ottawa Community Foundation.

]]>

A group of local youth watched the Ottawa Senators play their last home game of the season on April 2, 2018, thanks to Kids Up Front partners.

There are certain events from your childhood that you will always cherish. Remember the feeling of pure excitement when you attended your first NHL game? Or the adrenaline rush you felt going down a ski hill for the first time, or that sense of awe you felt at your first concert? For many families in Ottawa, these are experiences they just can’t afford to give their children.

Kids Up Front is creating these opportunities for Ottawa families by redistributing unused event tickets so that deserving children and their families have access to the stimulating worlds of art, culture and sports. By partnering with child-serving agencies around the city, Kids Up Front is able to identify and connect deserving children to the unused tickets.

In 2017, The Ottawa Community Foundation (OCF) granted $10,000 to the charitable organization to help them bring their concept to the Ottawa market and support an initiative that provides youth with positive experiences in their community, but that can also be life-changing and provide life-long memories.

“These donor dollars really helped us get our program off the ground,” explains Evan Patterson, Executive Director of Kids Up Front Ottawa. “The Foundation was instrumental in our success in year one.”

With key partners and core funding in place, Kids Up Front was able to begin operations. Once they established a good network of local business and child-serving organizations, they were able to begin redistributing tickets donated by their partners. On April 2, 2017, Kids Up Front redistributed their first pair of tickets to a young girl to attend the Juno Awards.

“Our focus in year one was connecting to the community”, explains Evan “We brought strategic key partners from the community together to ensure success.”

Kids Up Front has redistributed tickets for numerous events such as Bluesfest, Comic-Con, and countless Ottawa Senators’ games. While some community partners have donated tickets, others have waived admission fees or provided bus transportation to and from events.

Since their launch in the spring of 2017, Kids Up Front has redistributed over 5,000 tickets and has partnered with 53 child-serving agencies in the Ottawa area. In celebration of the one-year anniversary, they redistributed 40 tickets to local youth from Ottawa Community Housing to watch the Ottawa Senators play their last home game of the season on April 2, 2018.

With a successful first year, Evan has big plans for the future. “Our goal for next year is to focus on growth,” explains Evan. He hopes to increase public awareness of the organization, strengthen and grow the network of child-serving agencies, volunteers and the number of experiences donated.

Kids Up Front was founded 1999 and has since redistributed over 1 million tickets to children, youth across Canada. They have chapters in Calgary, Edmonton, Vancouver, Toronto, Ottawa and most recently Halifax. For more information or to see how you can get involved with Kids Up Front visit http://kidsupfront.com.

Kids up Front is one of more than 500 Ottawa-based charitable organizations the Ottawa Community Foundation provided a community grant to in 2017. For more information about the Foundation’s community grant program, visit https://www.ocf-fco.ca/grant-programs/

The post Creating memories, one ticket at a time appeared first on Ottawa Community Foundation.

]]>
Soup with A Social Impact https://www.ocf-fco.ca/blog/eat-more-soup/ Thu, 08 Mar 2018 19:59:05 +0000 https://www.ocf-fco.ca/?p=7951 March 8, 2018 Finding a job can be an extremely difficult and time-consuming task.  It can be especially stressful for adults with disabilities, low literacy skills, or no high school diploma. For these individuals, finding employment can be very challenging, and can result in chronic unemployment and financial instability. But thanks to a new social [...]

The post Soup with A Social Impact appeared first on Ottawa Community Foundation.

]]>
March 8, 2018

Finding a job can be an extremely difficult and time-consuming task.  It can be especially stressful for adults with disabilities, low literacy skills, or no high school diploma. For these individuals, finding employment can be very challenging, and can result in chronic unemployment and financial instability.

But thanks to a new social enterprise funded in part by the Ottawa Community Foundation (OCF), many vulnerable adults are able to gain the skills they need to enter the workforce. The program is called EAT MORE SOUP! and it is providing barrier-free employment training through mentorship and real-life experience. Over the 12-week program, interns work alongside a chef from Monday to Thursday, where they learn how to make delicious soups like spiced carrot, squash, and minestrone, which are then sold as part of the social enterprise.

EAT MORE SOUP! is an initiative of Alternative Learning Styles and Outlook (ALSO), an organization that the OCF is proud to have funded for more than 15 years. ALSO is an adult and family literacy centre that has been serving the Ottawa community for over 35 years.

In 2017, ALSO received a grant from the OCF for just over $15,000 to help launch EAT MORE SOUP! and hire a part-time chef. Later, they secured additional funding that allowed them to transitions to a full-time chef as well as cover the costs of the program for the first year.

“Our success would definitely not have been possible without the [OCF] grant,” explains Kim Oastler, Executive Director of EAT MORE SOUP!

With the funding in place, EAT MORE SOUP! was then able to leverage additional resources from the Centre for Social Enterprise Development (CSED). “My background is in not-for-profit so the food industry has been a steep learning curve,” says Kim. “Being a part of the CSED food Accelerator Program has been so helpful for me, from writing a business plan, to connecting me with the right people, and answering my questions. They have been so supportive.”

Since its launch in July 2017, the program has seen all interns graduate and receive job offers. Yoonis Guleed, a graduate of the program, recently accepted an offer to work at the Farm Boy warehouse. He believes the link to local employers is what sets this program apart from others.

“This program helps you find a job. There are so many programs that you can take and all you get is a certificate, this one actually helps you find a job after,” explains Yoonis.

Through their employment partnerships with organizations such as Farm Boy and Starbucks, EAT MORE SOUP! is able to provide interview training through mock interview sessions with human resource professionals. During these sessions, the interns are able to get live feedback and coaching which allows the interns to build confidence and prepares them for the real world. Upon completion of the program, the interns are guaranteed an interview with at least one employer partner.

The interns are also given the opportunity to give back to the community through BIG COOK Tuesdays. This partnership with the Boys and Girls Club allows the interns to mentor children and youth as well as teach them how to cook through the skills they have developed in the EAT MORE SOUP! kitchen. The children and youth learn valuable techniques on how to cook on a fixed income and are able to take the meals home to share with their families.

EAT MORE SOUP! now has five vegan and two vegetarian soups, and their products can be found in 13 stores across the city. For more information on where you can purchase these products visit http://www.eatmoresoup.org/.

[left to right]: David Irish EAT MORE SOUP! Chef, Yoonis Guleed EAT MORE SOUP! graduate, Gemma Follini ALSO Board Member, and Kim Oastler Executive Director of EAT MORE SOUP!, at the official launch event on February 2, 2018.

 

The post Soup with A Social Impact appeared first on Ottawa Community Foundation.

]]>
The Ottawa Community Foundation Welcomes New Board Members https://www.ocf-fco.ca/blog/ottawa-community-foundation-welcomes-new-board-members/ Thu, 01 Feb 2018 17:49:03 +0000 https://www.ocf-fco.ca/?p=7689 We are pleased to welcome three new members to our Board of Directors: Cyril Leeder, Madeleine Meilleur, and Yumi Kotani. We would also like to congratulate Susan St. Amand as she assumes the role of Chair of the Board. Cyril, Madeleine and Yumi are outstanding community leaders who bring a strong commitment to our city. [...]

The post The Ottawa Community Foundation Welcomes New Board Members appeared first on Ottawa Community Foundation.

]]>
We are pleased to welcome three new members to our Board of Directors: Cyril Leeder, Madeleine Meilleur, and Yumi Kotani. We would also like to congratulate Susan St. Amand as she assumes the role of Chair of the Board.

Cyril, Madeleine and Yumi are outstanding community leaders who bring a strong commitment to our city. We look forward to their expertise and insight as we embark on our next three-year strategic plan to make the city the best it can be.

Cyril Leeder

Investment Partners

 

 

 

 

 

 

Madeleine Meilleur

Senior Associate,
Institute on Governance

 

 

 

 

 

Yumi Kotani

Policy Analyst,
Settlement and Integration Policy Immigration,
Refugees and Citizenship Canada

 

 

 

 

 

About the Ottawa Community Foundation

Established in 1987, the Ottawa Community Foundation is a public, non-profit organization created by and for the people of Ottawa. Working directly with its community of donors, partners and stakeholders, the Foundation is committed to acting as a catalyst for positive, systemic and sustainable change in Ottawa and beyond. Priding itself on enabling generous citizens to enhance the quality of life in their community while achieving their own charitable objectives, the Foundation currently manages assets worth almost $130M, and has provided over $100M in grants to the community since its inception. For more information about the Ottawa Community Foundation, visit www.ocf-fco.ca

The post The Ottawa Community Foundation Welcomes New Board Members appeared first on Ottawa Community Foundation.

]]>
NEWS RELEASE – Ottawa Community Foundation Awards $125,000 to Youth Ottawa and the Social Planning Council of Ottawa to Tackle Youth Unemployment https://www.ocf-fco.ca/blog/news-release-nlcc-winner/ Wed, 22 Nov 2017 20:51:24 +0000 https://www.ocf-fco.ca/?p=7524 Jury Selects Project as part of the New Leaf Community Challenge. Nov. 22, 2017 (Ottawa, ON) – The Ottawa Community Foundation presented a cheque for $125,000 to Youth Ottawa and the Social Planning Council of Ottawa to tackle youth unemployment in the Ottawa region in a meaningful and sustainable way. Youth Active Media (YAM) is a [...]

The post NEWS RELEASE – Ottawa Community Foundation Awards $125,000 to Youth Ottawa and the Social Planning Council of Ottawa to Tackle Youth Unemployment appeared first on Ottawa Community Foundation.

]]>

Jury Selects Project as part of the New Leaf Community Challenge.

Nov. 22, 2017 (Ottawa, ON) – The Ottawa Community Foundation presented a cheque for $125,000 to Youth Ottawa and the Social Planning Council of Ottawa to tackle youth unemployment in the Ottawa region in a meaningful and sustainable way.

Youth Active Media (YAM) is a videography initiative that teaches high school aged youth, primarily from at-risk communities, to create short films about issues that affect their lives. YAM is also a social enterprise that provides some of these youth with career-building opportunities to earn income by producing videos for a range of clients including social service agencies. All youth who participate in the training develop a range of both soft skills and technical skills that increases their employability.

YAM was one of three proposals presented to a jury of community leaders and experts at the Ottawa Community Foundation’s fourth annual New Leaf Community Challenge on Wednesday at The Innovation Centre at Bayview Yards.

“Youth unemployment is 13.6% in this city, more than double the city-wide rate,” says Marco Pagani, President and CEO of the Community Foundation of Ottawa. “The impacts of youth not finding employment or starting on a career path when they leave high school can be devastating both personally and to the community and broader society.”

Originally launched in 2014, the New Leaf Community Challenge was designed to inspire and support innovative, collaborative approaches to addressing critical issues in Ottawa. The focus in the first two years was on food security and local food systems. A total of $250,000 was awarded to MarketMobile and the Deep Roots Food Hub. Since winning the New Leaf Community Challenge, these projects have increased access to healthy, affordable food, and helped build longer-term food sustainability for Ottawa. Last year’s winner of the youth employment theme was LiveWorkPlay, which continues to secure jobs for youth with intellectual disabilities, including significant involvement from the federal government.

The 2017 New Leaf Community Challenge attracted a variety of project submissions focused on improving the employment situation for youth who transition from high school to employment. In addition to the Youth Active Media, the other proposals were:

  • Prince’s Charities Canada and the Ottawa Community Housing Foundation presented ‘Get Into,’ a collaborative program designed to provide youth with training, work experience and permanent employment in a variety of sectors.
  • Youth Now Canada and the Parkdale Food Centre presented a proposal to provide agriculture-based training and work opportunities for at-risk youth.

“All of the projects presented at today’s Challenge were creative, compelling and, most importantly, designed to support positive, systemic, sustainable change in our community” said Pagani. “While I know it was a difficult decision for the jury, I am confident Youth Ottawa and the Social Planning Council of Ottawa will contribute to improving the employment situation for our young people.”

For more information about the New Leaf Community Challenge and the top three project submissions, visit https://www.ocf-fco.ca/new-leaf-community-challenge/

About the Ottawa Community Foundation

Established in 1987, the Ottawa Community Foundation is a public, non-profit organization created by and for the people of Ottawa. Working directly with its community of donors, partners and stakeholders, the Foundation is committed to acting as a catalyst for positive, systemic and sustainable change in Ottawa and beyond. Priding itself on enabling generous citizens to enhance the quality of life in their community while achieving their own charitable objectives, the Foundation currently manages assets worth almost $130M, and has provided over $100M in grants to the community since its inception. For more information about the Ottawa Community Foundation, visit www.ocf-fco.ca

– 30 –

For further information or to schedule an interview, please contact:

Danielle Côté
613-799-9057
dcote@ocf-fco.ca

The post NEWS RELEASE – Ottawa Community Foundation Awards $125,000 to Youth Ottawa and the Social Planning Council of Ottawa to Tackle Youth Unemployment appeared first on Ottawa Community Foundation.

]]>
Media Advisory – Ottawa Community Foundation Hosts 4th New Leaf Community Challenge https://www.ocf-fco.ca/blog/media-advisory-ottawa-community-foundation-hosts-4th-new-leaf-community-challenge/ Tue, 21 Nov 2017 15:22:12 +0000 https://www.ocf-fco.ca/?p=7515 Winners of the 2016 NLCC receive the ceremonial cheque from OCF President and CEO Marco Pagani (L). Nov. 21st, 2017 (Ottawa, ON) -  The Ottawa Community Foundation (OCF) is hosting its fourth annual New Leaf Community Challenge – a Dragon’s Den-style, live-juried event where three local charitable organizations will compete for a grant [...]

The post Media Advisory – Ottawa Community Foundation Hosts 4th New Leaf Community Challenge appeared first on Ottawa Community Foundation.

]]>

Winners of the 2016 NLCC receive the ceremonial cheque from OCF President and CEO Marco Pagani (L).

Nov. 21st, 2017 (Ottawa, ON) –  The Ottawa Community Foundation (OCF) is hosting its fourth annual New Leaf Community Challenge – a Dragon’s Den-style, live-juried event where three local charitable organizations will compete for a grant of $125,000 to tackle youth unemployment.

Who:
Marco Pagani, President and Chief Executive Officer, OCF
Rebecca Aird, Director, Grants and Community Knowledge, OCF

When:
Wednesday, November 22nd, 2017
9:00 am – Welcome and Introductions
9:15 – 11:20 am – Proposal pitches by the three finalists to the jury
11:20 – 11:50 am – Deliberations by the jury
11:45 – 11:50 am – Update from the 2016 NLCC winner, LiveWorkPlay
11:50 am – Winner announced

Where: The Innovation Centre at Bayview Yards, 7 Bayview Road, Ottawa

Parking: 2 hr street parking or $2/hour in the pay and display lot adjacent to the building.

The finalists (learn more here):

  1. Prince’s Charities Canada (PCC), in partnership with the Ottawa Community Housing Foundation, proposes to bring the Get Into program to Ottawa. The program is a collaboration between employers and youth-service community organizations that would provide 60 youth with training, work experience and jobs.
  2. Youth Active Media, a collaboration between The Social Planning Council and Youth Ottawa, is looking to significantly boost their youth social enterprise, which produces videos for a range of clients. YAM teaches youth, primarily from at-risk communities, to create short films about issues that affect their lives. Through the process of filmmaking, youth learn a range of core skills, and can work in the social enterprise.
  3. Youth Now Canada and the Parkdale Food Centre will present an agri-employment and entrepreneurship Initiative where youth will receive paid pre-employment training and a paid on-farm work placement to prepare them for employment opportunities.

The jury:

Ingrid Argyle , Manager, Ottawa Employment Hub (Local Employment Planning Council) and Labour Market Ottawa

Tim Brodhead, Board member, Ottawa Community Foundation; Former President & CEO, J.W. McConnell Family Foundation

Jeff Burry, Executive Director, Christie Lake Kids; former Director of Employment Services, Youth Services Bureau of Ottawa

Tracey Clark, President & CEO, Bridgehead Coffee

Shlomo Coodin, Algonquin College student (Business Marketing and Non-Profit Management); graduate of Rogers Achievement Center at Operation Come Home

Heidi Hauver, Chief Human Resource Officer and Managing Partner, Keynote Group; HR & Growth Coach, Invest Ottawa

Sue-Ellen Holst, RBC Foundation Director of Donations, Ontario North & East

Bruce McKean, Volunteer with the Ottawa Community Foundation (focusing on mental health); corporate social responsibility consultant; Vice-Chair, Cuso International

Jozef Straus, Queso Grande; formerly CEO of JDS Uniphase

-30-

About the Ottawa Community Foundation

Established in 1987, the Ottawa Community Foundation is a public, non-profit organization created by and for the people of Ottawa. Working directly with its community of donors, partners and stakeholders, the Foundation is committed to acting as a catalyst for positive, systemic and sustainable change in Ottawa and beyond. Priding itself on enabling generous citizens to enhance the quality of life in their community while achieving their own charitable objectives, the Foundation currently manages assets worth almost $130M, and has provided over $100M in grants to the community since its inception. For more information about the Ottawa Community Foundation, visit www.ocf-fco.ca

About the New Leaf Community Challenge

The NLCC initiative is designed to inspire and support the Ottawa community to work together to address the city’s most pressing issues. What we learn about youth unemployment, or other issues identified each year, helps us better use other Foundation levers such as community grants and impact investing, to support ongoing progress in this area.  www.ocf-fco.ca/nlcc-2017/

Media Contact:

Heather Badenoch
613-859-8232
heather@villagepr.ca

or

Danielle Côté
613-799-9057
dcote@ocf-fco.ca

The post Media Advisory – Ottawa Community Foundation Hosts 4th New Leaf Community Challenge appeared first on Ottawa Community Foundation.

]]>
Building Jobs for the Future https://www.ocf-fco.ca/blog/building-jobs-future/ Mon, 20 Nov 2017 17:40:01 +0000 https://www.ocf-fco.ca/?p=7472 Ottawa Community Foundation grant helps unemployed youth find a new direction November 20, 2017 Mohamed Herguteye and his seven brothers and sisters grew up in a small village in Ethiopia. “Life was very hard for us growing up,” he explains.  “There were not a lot of jobs for our parents, so it was very tough [...]

The post Building Jobs for the Future appeared first on Ottawa Community Foundation.

]]>
Ottawa Community Foundation grant helps unemployed youth find a new direction
November 20, 2017

Mohamed Herguteye and his seven brothers and sisters grew up in a small village in Ethiopia.

“Life was very hard for us growing up,” he explains.  “There were not a lot of jobs for our parents, so it was very tough and an unhealthy environment.”

For Mohamed’s parents, it was a constant struggle to provide for their growing family, and in September 2016 they decided to make a drastic change.  In search of a fresh start and a brighter future for their children, the Herguteyes left their native land and moved the family to Canada.

At a Lumber Mill in Perth as part of the training program (Mohamed on left)

It’s only been one year since the big move, but Mohamed has already seen tremendous benefits from his family’s life-altering decision to leave Africa.  As a refugee, the 23-year-old was matched with the Social Planning Council of Ottawa and was eligible to take part in the Building Greener Futures Together initiative.  The program recruits unemployed youth (under the age of 30), with an interest in the construction trades, and helps them build their skills through training and job placements.

Thanks to a 2017 grant of $40,000 from the Ottawa Community Foundation (OCF), more than 30 youth have been able to access the program. This brings the total investment from the OCF to $120,000 over four years, an amount that has been instrumental in the long-term sustainability and growth of this program.

“They complete a training program with us, which includes learning a number of soft and hard skills,” explains Heather Hunter, program coordinator for the Social Planning Council of Ottawa.  “The participants learn everything from building a resume and communication to the on-the-job technical skills they get from working with a contractor.”

Mohamed successfully completed his training program and earned a placement at Revelstoke Development Corporation.  He spends his days working at a number of construction job sites, doing things like demolition work and helping to install drywall and place new windows.  His strong work ethic and positive attitude have made a real impact on his colleagues and mentors.

“He is so hard working.  This industry starts early, and you need to be on the job site for 7 a.m.,” explains Heather.  “Mohamed had to be on the bus for 6 a.m.  He was never late and never once missed a day of work during his training program – he is always smiling.”

Installing siding at a Habitat for Humanity site (also as part of the training program) – Mohamed is in the middle.

Heather believes the Building Greener Futures Together employment intervention is incredibly meaningful to the youth who are looking to make positive changes in their lives.

“I have seen the impact it has on kids; they stop by our office years later and give us their business cards and we see how it’s made a difference,” she explains.  “It’s the difference between being unemployed without direction to having permanent employment and working above minimum wage.”

“They have the chance to work in a viable industry and doing something that fits their interests and skills.  It can really be life changing for many.”

Today, Mohamed is happy and enjoying his new life as a Canadian citizen, and he celebrates every milestone that comes with his continued success at work.

“Having this job and this experience helped me to be more independent for my life,” he explains.  “And the more experience I get, the better I will be to find more jobs in the future.”

The post Building Jobs for the Future appeared first on Ottawa Community Foundation.

]]>
Thinking of Applying for a Multi-Year Grant? https://www.ocf-fco.ca/blog/thinking-applying-multi-year-grant/ Tue, 07 Nov 2017 15:16:18 +0000 https://www.ocf-fco.ca/?p=7031 The Ottawa Community Foundation provides multi-year grants to local organizations to support the evolution of an initiative over a period of two or three years. To be considered for a multi-year grant, organizations must submit a Letter of Intent by December 1. Following this, successful organizations will be invited to submit a multi-year grant application [...]

The post Thinking of Applying for a Multi-Year Grant? appeared first on Ottawa Community Foundation.

]]>
The Ottawa Community Foundation provides multi-year grants to local organizations to support the evolution of an initiative over a period of two or three years. To be considered for a multi-year grant, organizations must submit a Letter of Intent by December 1. Following this, successful organizations will be invited to submit a multi-year grant application by February 1 for consideration by the OCF Grants Committee.

If you are considering applying for a multi-year grant, please review our Granting Guidelines and Eligibility. If you are not certain your initiative is a good fit, feel free to contact us to discuss your multi-year project prior to submitting a Letter of Intent. Please email us, or call Tais McNeill (CGP coordinator) at 613-236-1616 ext. 223 or Rebecca Aird (Director) at ext. 222. Download the Letter of Intent submission form and the Multi-Year Project Budget Form.

And finally, here are 10 tips to help your organization increase its chances of receiving a grant:

  1. Give yourself time to plan the grant-writing process. 

    Writing a grant at the last minute is a sure-way to fail. Allow yourself enough time to look over funders’ criteria, clearly articulate your objectives and explore possible partnerships.

  2. Build a relationship with your funder.

    We are a partner in your organization; therefore, it’s important to consider us in that way, not just as a provider of money. Good relationships take time and require ongoing engagement.

  3. Talk to us. 

    Think of the OCF as a partner in your process. Call us early in your planning process to discuss ideas and possible partnerships, and to ask questions.

  4. Align your project with our strategies. 

    This information is available on our website. See No. 3!

  5. Read our information.

    Review our granting guidelines and eligibly criteria. It may seem overwhelming at first so remember No. 1!

  6. Talk to others about their granting successes and failures.

    Learning from others and your community should be part of your ongoing evaluation and feedback process. Also, give yourself permission to fail, but make sure you learn from the experience.

  7. Articulate your case simply, clearly, and with a solid solution.

    Grant reviewers read many proposals and don’t necessarily know about your organization and your needs. Consider getting someone outside your organization to review your proposal with a focus on these points.

  8. Collaborate with others. 

    This point is important enough to mention again. We often read proposals from different organizations trying to tackle similar issues. Success in the not-for-profit sector often comes from working together, so consider who might be a good partner.

  9. Consider how the donor profile and donation behaviors are changing. 

    There are important changes and trends taking place in and outside the sector that may impact your charity, such as the popularity of non-charitable online platforms and the lack of loyalty to a specific organization among millennials. Stay relevant to donors and create new ways to create meaningful engagement.

  10. Remember the bigger picture. 

    Your focus and passion for your cause might blind you to the bigger picture. When making your case, make sure to communicate why what you are doing is important to the larger picture, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada, the world.

The post Thinking of Applying for a Multi-Year Grant? appeared first on Ottawa Community Foundation.

]]>
Dandelion Dance Takes Root https://www.ocf-fco.ca/blog/dandelion-dance/ Thu, 02 Nov 2017 14:32:10 +0000 https://www.ocf-fco.ca/?p=7001 Creating a stronger community through dance November 2, 2017 Annika Peveril still remembers the very first time she walked through the doors at Dandelion Dance. Her family had undergone some pretty big changes, the biggest of which was a move across the country to Ottawa from their home in Canmore, Alberta. Annika, who joined Dandelion [...]

The post Dandelion Dance Takes Root appeared first on Ottawa Community Foundation.

]]>
Creating a stronger community through dance
November 2, 2017

Annika Peveril still remembers the very first time she walked through the doors at Dandelion Dance. Her family had undergone some pretty big changes, the biggest of which was a move across the country to Ottawa from their home in Canmore, Alberta.

Annika, who joined Dandelion as a young girl, continued on as a teenager, ultimately joining Dandelion’s Performance Company.

Being incredibly quiet and shy, Annika struggled to make friends at her new school and was often left by herself at lunch and during recess.  After months of enduring the intense pressure that comes with feeling isolated by her peers, Annika began to show troubling signs of anxiety. She was just seven years old.

“I was really sad – I would always sit by myself with no one to talk to,” Annika confesses.  “I felt so alone.”

Looking back, the now 18-year-old is incredibly grateful that her mom discovered the Dandelion Dance group.  During her time in the Dandelion program, Annika and her classmates were given the freedom to create their own works.  Together, they learned how to express their individuality through movement and gained the confidence and courage to share their voices with the world.

Today, more girls like Annika are able to benefit from this unique approach, thanks to a three-year, $42,500 grant from the Ottawa Community Foundation.  This important seed funding was a turning point for the organization, allowing Dandelion to provide specialized training to more facilitators and distribute bursaries to girls living in low-income households.

“We could not have expanded our impact without the support of the Ottawa Community Foundation.  We are forever grateful for their support and encouragement,” explains Monica Chohan, Co-Executive Director of Dandelion Dance.  “With this generous multi-year grant, we are able to connect with more families and expand our outreach to young girls living in marginalized communities.  We are able to have a real, long-term impact in young lives.”

Giving girls, ages 6 to 18, the opportunity to connect with one another in a safe, supportive and inclusive environment is at the root of the Dandelion method.  For more than 17 years, creator Hannah Beach has been developing this unique approach to empowerment and the results have been nothing short of inspiring, especially for girls like Annika.

“Dandelion Dance changed my life,” she explains.  “It was somewhere I could go and be myself without the fear of being judged by anyone.”

Dandelion Dance was founded in 2000 as Tournesol, a private dance school here in Ottawa.  In 2012 it transformed, and grew into its role as a not-for-profit and charitable organization.  With the Dandelion approach, program instructors serve as facilitators, guiding the girls through the creative process that enables them to give movement to issues they care about, while at the same time helping them develop key social skills such as leadership, empathy, acceptance, communication and community building.

Monica believes the strength of the programs come from the openness of the girls and their willingness to break down barriers and connect with one another, regardless of where they are from or who they are.

“We have girls who are both shy and very outgoing, some who have a disability, newcomers to Canada, girls getting top marks at school, and girls with so many different passions and interests,” she explains.  “At Dandelion, everyone has a unique background, but they are all brought together through dance.”

You can find out more about Dandelion Dance by visiting www.dandeliondance.ca.

The post Dandelion Dance Takes Root appeared first on Ottawa Community Foundation.

]]>